~: Dasha Mahavidya :~
  Dasha Mahavidya (10 Mahavidyas)  
 
Kali

In her most famous pose as Daksinakali, it is said that Kali, becoming drunk on the blood of her victims on the battlefield, dances with destructive frenzy. In her fury she fails to see the body of her husband Shiva who lies among the corpses on the battlefield. Ultimately the cries of Shiva attract Kali's attention, calming her fury. As a sign of her shame at having disrespected her husband in such a fashion, Kali sticks out her tongue.
One South Indian tradition tells of a dance contest between Shiva and Kali. After defeating the two demons Sumbha and Nisumbha, Kali stays in a forest. With fierce companions she terrorizes the surrounding area. One of Shiva's devotees becomes distracted while doing austerities and asks Shiva to rid the forest of the destructive goddess. When Shiva arrives, Kali threatens him, claiming the territory as her own. Shiva challenges her to a dance contest, and defeats her when she is unable to perform the energetic Tandava dance. Although here Kali is defeated, and is forced to control her disruptive habits, we find very few images or other myths depicting her in such manner.
Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa
Great devotee of Dakshinakali at Dakshineshwar, West Bengal was Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa who worshipped her as mother.
In her form as Dakshina Kali, she is the real form of all vidyas (goddesses) who give siddhi (success). Because Shiva and Shakti are one, they must be worshipped together.
 
Tara

The oral tradition gives an intriguing origin to the goddess Tara. The legend begins with the churning of the ocean between the Devas (Hindu Gods) and Asuras (Hindu Demons). The Deva Shiva drank the poison that was created from the churning of the ocean (in the process turning his throat blue and earning him the epithet Nilakantha), thus saving the world from destruction, but fell unconscious under its powerful effect. Tara Ma appeared and took Shiva on her lap. She suckled him, the milk from her breasts counteracting the poison, and he recovered. This story is reminiscent of the one in which Shiva stops the rampaging Kali by becoming an infant. Seeing the child, Kali's maternal instinct comes to the fore, and she becomes quiet and nurses the infant Shiva. In both cases, Shiva assumes the position of an infant.

Bamakhepa
Bamakhepa is the famous devotee of Ma Tara. He worshipped Tara as his mother and became very famous tanric.
 
Tripura Sundari

The presiding Deity of Srichakra, Devi, is Known as Lalita Tripura Sundari. The goddess Tripura Sundari in her aspect as Shodasi is represented as a sixteen-year-old girl, and is believed to embody sixteen types of desire. Tripura Sundari, also called Shodashi, Lalita and Rajarajeshvari.
 
Bhuvaneshwari

Bhuvaneshvari is the fourth of the ten Mahavidya goddesses and an aspect of Devi. Bhuvaneshvari, who is known for her beauty. Bhuvanesvari means Mistress of the World. Bhuvaneshvari's beauty is mentioned often. Her dhyana describes her as having a radiant vermilion complexion resembling the sunrise and a beautiful face. She has three eyes and a pleasant, nurturing smile. She has four arms, in two of which she holds a noose and a goad. With her lower left hand, she makes the gesture (varada-mudra) of offering a boon, and with the lower right she signals fearlessness (abhaya mudra).
 
Tripura Bhairavi

Bhairavi is a fierce and terrifying aspect of the Goddess virtually indistinguishable from Kali. Bhairavi is also identified with Kalaratri, a name often associated with Kali that means “black night (of destruction)” and refers to a particularly destructive aspect of Kali.
 
Chinnamasta

Chinnamasta (also called Chinnamastaka), is one of the mahavidyas, and an aspect of Devi. Chinnamasta, having severed her own head with her own sword, holds her severed head on one of her hands. Three jets of blood spurt out of her bleeding neck, and one streams into her own mouth of her severed head, while the other two streams into the mouths of her two female associates.
 
Dhumavati

Dhumavati is one the of mahavidyas (Great Wisdoms); she is one of the many aspects of Devi. She acts as the divine smoke screen in the form of old age and death. Only the ardent devotee is able to see beyond the fear of mortality to the Goddess's promise of immortality.

The dhyana mantra of Dhumavati says:
Dhumavati is ugly, unsteady, and angry. She is tall and wears dirty clothes. Her ears are ugly and rough, she has long teeth, and her breasts hang down. She has a long nose. She has the form of a widow. She rides in a chariot decorated with the emblem of the crow. Her eyes are fearsome, and her hands tremble. In one hand she holds a winnowing basket, and with the other hand she makes the gesture of conferring boons. Her nature is rude. She is always hungry and thirsty and looks unsatisfied. She likes to create strife, and she is always frightful in appearance.
 
Bhagalamukhi

Bagala or Bagalamukhi is the eighth Mahavidya in the famous series of the 10 Mahavidyas. Bagalamukhi means "The Crane-Headed One". This bird is thought of as the essence of deceit.

Expounding the great power of the Goddess Baglamukhi the text Mantra Maharnnav states -"The Mantra of the Goddess has the power of the divine weapon Brahmastra instilled in it and the Goddess simply strikes terror in and paralyses the enemies of her Sadhaks. Repetition of her Mantra is enough to stop even a tempest."
 
Matangi

Matangi is the aspect of Devi (in other words, the Mahavidya) who is the patron of inner thought. She guides her devotee to the uncaused primordial sound. Matangi has a dark emerald complexion and has three eyes.

It is said that once Vishnu and Lakshmi went to visit Shiva and Parvati. Vishnu and Lakshmi gave Shiva and Parvati fine foods, and some pieces dropped to the ground. From these remains arose a maiden endowed with fair qualities. She asked for leftover food (uccishtha). The four deities offered her their leftovers as prasada (food made sacred by having been tasted by deities). Shiva then said to the attractive maiden: "Those who repeat your mantra and worship you, their activities will be fruitful. They will be able to control their enemies and obtain the objects of their desires." From then on this maiden became known as Uccishtha-matangini. She is the bestower of all boons.
 
Kamalatmika

Kamalatmika is the Goddess Devi in the fullness of her graceful aspect. She is shown as seated on a lotus, symbol of purity. Kamala is a beautiful young woman with a shining complexion. Kamalatmika is the 10th Mahavidya. She is also known as Kamala. Kamala like Lakshmi is a goddess of fortune, ritches, fertility and conception of children, fame, and material well being.
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